Then, contact your local natural history museum. Many have special events where members of the public can bring in things they’ve found for identification, and even if they…

Archeology with a shovel

In general, fossils may not be collected from National Parks, State Parks, and US Interstate road cuts. Collecting on private property is only to be undertaken with permission…

Archeology with a shovel

In general, fossils may not be collected from National Parks, State Parks, and US Interstate road cuts. Collecting on private property is only to be undertaken with permission…

Archeology with a shovel

Paleontologists use fossil remains to understand different aspects of extinct and living organisms. Individual fossils may contain information about an organism’s life and environment. Much like the rings…

Archeology with a shovel

If you find a dinosaur fossil on private land, it’s yours to do with as you please. In the United States, the fossilized remains of the mighty creatures…

Archeology with a shovel

How do you dig up a fossil? So scientists use bulldozers to dig away chunks of rock and soil. 2. Workers then use shovels, drills, hammers, and chisels…

Archeology with a shovel

This supports Darwin’s theory of evolution, which states that simple life forms gradually evolved into more complex ones. Evidence for early forms of life comes from fossils. By…

Archeology with a shovel

Evidence for early forms of life comes from fossils. By studying fossils, scientists can learn how much (or how little) organisms have changed as life developed on Earth….

Archeology with a shovel

Paleontological resources, or fossils, are any evidence of past life preserved in geologic context. They are a tangible connection to life, landscapes, and climates of the past. They…

Archeology with a shovel

They are even among the very first genera given a scientific name. By far the most common fossil, based on the number of times it occurs in collections,…

Archeology with a shovel